Bouncy Houses Lead to Serious Injury and Lawsuits | Frenkel & Frenkel
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Oct 31
2014

Bouncy Houses Lead to Serious Injury and Lawsuits

broken arm bouncy house lawsuit DallasVideo of a bouncy house in Colorado that was thrown 300 feet with children inside went viral recently, but experts say that the houses have led to many serious injuries and lawsuits over the past few years. Injuries such as head injuries, broken bones and bloody noses are common, say attorneys. Incident Details The bouncy house in Colorado was part of the Rocky Mountain Lacrosse Jamboree in Jefferson County. Winds were gusting up to 30 miles per hour, causing the house to become untethered and sail into the air, landing 300 feet from its original spot. A young girl going down the slide when the house was tossed was thrown about eight feet into the air and ejected. A 10-year-old boy inside the house was rushed to the hospital, but expected to make a full recovery. This is just the latest case of serious injuries related to bouncy houses. A 22-year-old woman in Florida broke her leg in six places when she slipped on a wet bouncy house while trying to retrieve her toddler. She received a large settlement from the homeowner’s insurance and the rental company after her lawsuit. Lack of Regulations In many states, there are no laws related to the regulation of inflatables like bouncy houses. Many small companies are not insured, and those that do seek insurance often have trouble finding a company willing to insure them. A report by the Houston Chronicle found that even in states such as Texas where inflatable businesses are regulated, many rogue operators fail to register the business or obtain insurance. The report found that of 170 companies that advertised inflatable rentals in Houston, only 30 were licensed by the state (http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-07-16/bouncy-houses-so-much-fun-and-an-insurance-nightmare). Homeowner Liability In states where inflatables are not regulated or when dealing with small bouncy house providers that are not adequately insured, an injury to someone using the bouncy house could result in responsibility falling to the homeowner. Some may even face expensive lawsuits if a guest is injured in the inflatable. Most homeowner’s insurance policies cover bouncy house injuries, with basic plans offering $100,000 in liability coverage, but this may not be enough to cover the cost of a lawsuit if the injury is severe. When a dangerous product is suspected as the cause or contributing factor in an incident that causes injury or death, a personal injury or wrongful death lawsuit may be in order. Contact Dallas-Fort Worth lawyers at Frenkel & Frenkel to schedule a free initial consultation regarding an incident where injuries may have been caused or worsened by someone else’s negligence.