What is Transvaginal Mesh? | Frenkel & Frenkel
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Sep 29
2012

What is Transvaginal Mesh?

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Transvaginal mesh, developed in the 1990s, is designed to support pelvic organs when the pelvic muscles have weakened, causing the bladder, rectum and uterus to drop into the vagina.

Frenkel & Frenkel, a Dallas law firm, knows that many women have asked the question “What is transvaginal mesh?” after hearing news reports of problems with the product.  Transvaginal mesh, developed in the 1990s, is designed to support pelvic organs when the pelvic muscles have weakened, causing the bladder, rectum and uterus to drop into the vagina. What is Transvaginal Mesh? Older women often suffer from a condition known as Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP), normally after childbirth, hysterectomy, or menopause that causes the pelvic muscles to weaken and pelvic organs to drop.  Although most women have no symptoms[i], POP can cause pelvic pressure, low backache, painful intercourse, and incontinence or bowel problems.  In order to repair the problem, surgeons implant a hammock-like surgical mesh through the vagina—or transvaginally—to support the organs. Transvaginal Mesh Complications In 2008, the United States Food and Drug Administration[ii] issued a warning that rare health risks had been linked to transvaginal mesh usage.  Over the next few years, the FDA continued to monitor complications reported after the use of the procedure, and, in July 2011, reported that the complications from transvaginal mesh were not rare, and furthermore introduced risks not present in traditional non-mesh treatment of POP.  Complications included pain, infection, bleeding, pain during intercourse, organ perforation and urinary problems.  The most common complaint was mesh erosion or exposure through the vagina.  Some women also reported vaginal scarring or shrinkage, recurrent prolapse, and even emotional problems from what is transvaginal mesh. Treatment For those who know what is transvaginal mesh, and have had complications, surgery[iii] may be required to remove the mesh and to repair the vaginal tissues to prevent POP.  Once the sling is removed, however, many women again suffer from the symptoms of POP, including urinary stress incontinence. The FDA continues to monitor women who have experienced problems with what is transvaginal mesh.  If you have further questions, or have experienced transvaginal mesh complications, contact us at 214-333-3333, 817-222-2222 or toll free at 800-834-0000.